How to Create Salesforce Custom Report Types: 3 Popular Examples

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Reporting is arguably the most powerful feature in Salesforce, providing a clear picture of what is happening within the business. There are two types of reports in Salesforce: Standard reports and Custom report types. Salesforce provides us with a huge collection of standard report types out-of-the-box can fulfil most business requirements.

Sometimes, though, you need to create report types that go beyond the standard types. Do you need to report on more than 2 objects at a time? Do you want to report on record ‘without’ a relationship (eg. Contacts without Accounts), instead of just a ‘with’ relationship? These are great examples of when you would look to create a custom report type.

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Features of Custom Report Types

Creating a Custom Report Type involves selecting the standard and custom objects you would like to include, and their relationship (which we will see later in the tutorial).

Reading this post, you may never have come across Custom Report Types. Don’t worry, we will start with an overview of 4 features Custom Report Types have:

  • Multiple Objects: add up to 4 layers of objects as long as they have a parent-child relationship,
  • Fields via Lookup: you can add fields into the report from any related object,
  • Create, remove, rename & reorder sections and fields,
  • Default Columns: you can control which columns already display on the report when you create a new one.

Read the full post: 4 Features of Custom Report Types

Before we start, only Salesforce Administrator or users with the ‘Manage Custom Report Types’ can create Custom Report, so check you have this before continuing.

Example 1: Accounts With or Without Opportunities

Use this to create Reports on Accounts and their Opportunities, perfect for understanding target account for sales reps.

Step 1: Defining the Custom Report

  1. Go to Setup, find Report Types from the quick find box. Click the ’New Custom Report Type’
    Follow the screenshot below.

  1. Select the primary object – in this case, “Accounts”.

This is a very important step because a record from this object will always be present in the data in the report.

Fill all the necessary information, such as:

  • Report Type Label
  • Report type Name (it will auto-populate once you click out of the Report type Label field)
  • Description
  • Store in Category – which section you want users to look in when they reach the new report pop-up window.
  • Click Deployed
  • Click Next.

Step 2: Report Records Set

Now define object relationship for this custom report type. Define which related records from other objects are returned in the report results by choosing a relationship to another object.

  1. Click on the box with the dotted border, which says ‘click to relate to another object’, choose Opportunities.
  2. In box B, select Each “A” records may or may not have related “B” records. It means Accounts may or may not have Opportunities. Click

Step 3: Report Layout (Fields for Users in the Report Builder)

Next step is to choose the fields that will be available for the reports when users use the Report Builder.

1. Click Edit Layout button

2. Select fields from the pane on the right-hand side and drag to one of the grey grids on the left.

3. Click Preview Layout and see which fields are included in the report. If you want to rename or set which fields are selected by default for users, select one or more field and Click Edit Properties

  • Click the Checked by Default checkbox next to one or more fields. Display the checkbox icon () on the field layout of the custom report type.
  • Change the text in the Display As field next to the field you want to rename

4. To rename the sections, click Edit next to an existing section, or create a new section by clicking Create New Section. Click Save.

Example 2: Contacts With Case Activities

Use this to create Reports for Contacts who have activities on related cases.

Step 1: Defining the Custom Report

Start as we did in the previous example.

  1. Select the primary object, in this case, “Contacts”.

Fill all the necessary information, as we did in Example 1. This report type will be called ‘Contacts with Case Activity’. You can use the screenshot below for guidance:

Step 2: Report Records Set

Now define object relationship for this custom report type. Define which related records from other objects are returned in the report results by choosing a relationship to another object.

  1. Click on the box with the dotted border, which says click to relate to another object. In this case, choose Cases.
  2. In box B, Select Each “A” records must have at least one related “B” record. It means Contacts must have Cases.
  3. Click to relate another object, and choose “Activities”
  4. Select Each “B” record must have at least one related “C” record. This means only Contacts with Cases that have Activities will be returned in the report. Follow the screenshot below.

Step 3: Report Layout

Follow Step 3 from Example 1.

Example 3: Accounts With Orders, Including Products

Use this to create Reports on Accounts with Orders including Products related to those Orders.

Step 1: Defining the Custom Report

Start as we did in the previous example.

1. Select the primary object, in this case, “Accounts”. Fill all the necessary information, as we did in Example 1. You can use the screenshot below for guidance.

Step 2: Report Records Set

Now define object relationship for this custom report type. Define which related records from other objects are returned in the report results by choosing a relationship to another object.

  1. Click on the box with the dotted border, which says click to relate to another object. In this case, choose
  2. In box B, select Each “A” records must have at least one related “B” record. It means Accounts must have Orders.
  3. Click to relate another object, and choose “Products”
  4. Select Each “B” record must have at least one related “C” record. This means only Accounts with Orders that have Products will be returned in the report. Follow the screenshot below:

Step 3: Report Layout

Follow Step 3 from Example 1.

Summary

I hope this post has shown you the possibilities available with custom report types. You may have some in mind now to create, in order to provide your users with meaningful reports based on business requirements and their roles in the organisation.

A simple exercise for you, that will continue to provide a lot of value into the future!

What examples of custom report types have you created? Let us know in the comments!

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